top of page

China, Pakistan and Turkey Eyeing Kashmir - by Uzay Bulut for The Gatestone Institute – 13.06.23

The history of the Islamization of indigenous non-Muslim populations of Kashmir is similar to that of the Middle East and North Africa: native non-Muslim peoples were first conquered by Islamic armies and then subjected to discrimination and persecution, which led to either death, conversion to Islam or departure/flight.


Due to killings and forced conversions, there are no Hindus remaining in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, although it is still home to ancient Hindu sacred sites.


The anti-Hindu violence culminated in 1989-1990 when Pakistan-sponsored insurgents carried out an ethnic cleansing campaign against the approximately 95% of the Hindus living in the Valley of Kashmir.


Meanwhile, Pakistan remains a major sponsor of global terrorism.


Jihad is a global threat targeting the entire international community. For the safety and stability of the region and beyond, it is crucial not to let jihad succeed. India's sovereignty over Kashmir and the international community's support for hosting international events, as well as tourism in Kashmir, are critical for the global fight against terrorism. It is also beneficial to the residents of Kashmir – particularly women, peaceful Muslims, indigenous Hindus and other non-Muslim minorities.


Those countries that oppose Kashmir as part of India and attempt to dissuade international events such as the G20 conference to promote tourism are hardly advocating the establishment of a secular, pluralistic democracy in Kashmir.


Their goal, rather, is to create an Islamist state in Kashmir where women, religious minorities, and moderate Muslims would be persecuted – just as in anyplace else taken over by Islamic theocracy.


Such a state would also be a center of terrorism and instability in the wider region. The civilized world needs to support India's sovereignty in Kashmir against foreign interference from oppressive states -- such as China, Turkey and Pakistan.


When India hosted a key G20 conference in Srinagar, the capital of the Jammu and Kashmir Union Territory of India, on May 22 and 23, even though the conference was reportedly attended by around 122 delegates, including 60 foreigners, it was boycotted by Pakistan as well as its longtime allies, China and Turkey.


Pakistan called the meeting "illegal." Jammu and Kashmir is an integral part of India, but it is claimed by Pakistan, which has violently targeted the region through terror groups. Hundreds of people therefore rallied in the Pakistan-occupied area of Kashmir to protest the meeting.


Three G20 member countries (China, Saudi Arabia and Turkey) as well as two guest-countries invited by India (Egypt and Oman) were among those that did not send delegations. However, three Muslim countries did attend the meeting: Indonesia, United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bangladesh.


During the meeting, India showcased its development work in the region, as well as the tourism potential of the Jammu and Kashmir. The International Centre for Peace Studies in New Delhi reported that prior to the conference, Pakistan attempted to undermine the event:


"Since May, secessionists supported by Pakistan have made persistent efforts to undermine the forthcoming G-20 event. In the border area of Poonch in the Jammu division, armed individuals following instructions from across the border have posed a threat to regional peace for over two weeks.


"The terrorist attack in Poonch resulted in the loss of five soldiers, with one terrorist neutralized and others still being pursued. Additionally, local sympathizers have been apprehended by the security forces."


Kashmir, historically, is Hindu and Buddhist. For thousands of years, until the 14th century when Islamic invaders from Central Asia took control, it had a population that was majority-Hindu and Buddhist. Today, it is majority-Muslim.


The history of the Islamization of indigenous non-Muslim populations of Kashmir is similar to that of the Middle East and North Africa: native non-Muslim peoples were first conquered by Islamic armies and then subjected to discrimination and persecution, which led to either death, conversion to Islam or departure/flight.


For the full article in pdf, please click here:

China, Pakistan and Turkey Eyeing Kashmir - by Uzay Bulut for The Gatestone Institute – 13
.
Download • 68KB

Uzay Bulut, a Turkish journalist, is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Gatestone Institute. She is also a research fellow for the Philos Project.


© 2023 Gatestone Institute. All rights reserved. The articles printed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editors or of Gatestone Institute. No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without the prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.






17 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page